Exisle

Exisle

ExIsle

A board game for younger gamers aimed at increasing the appreciation of the sciences and their relevancy in everyday life. Part of the NSF-funded “Transforming Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) For Women and Girls: Reworking Stereotypes & Bias” project.

Designed Winter 2011 and Spring 2012, for Tiltfactor Laboratory at Dartmouth College (ongoing project)

Collaborators: Max Seidman, Mary Flanagan, Zara Downs

In Exisle, players explore the territories of an ancient island-civilisation and attempt to reclaim the lost scientific knowledge that once made the civilisation great. The goal is that players will begin to appreciate the value of the sciences by actively using them within the game context.

Exisle was initially designed by Mary Flanagan and Zara Downs, who then handed the project to Max Seidman and me. We proceeded to substantially change the boards, redesign player abilities and the challenges they needed to overcome, and altered the win condition to reflect a more socially conscious model (i.e. without the usual “conquer everything” or “win all the money” player goals). Play-testing then showed that substantial changes were needed to make the game more engaging for girls, and current work focuses on that need.

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Teaser-Totter

Teaser-Totter

Teaser Totter

A party game tackling gender bias combining quick-thinking and physical coordination. Part of the NSF-funded “Transforming Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) For Women and Girls: Reworking Stereotypes & Bias” project.

Designed Winter 2011, for Tiltfactor Laboratory at Dartmouth College (ongoing project)

Collaborators: Max Seidman, Jasmine Kumalah

In Teaser-Totter, teams of players  solve cryptic clues while balancing objects on their bodies. The clues and solutions are designed in such a way as to force players to re-examine traditional views of gender roles in society.

Jasmine Kumalah and I were the lead designers of this game (which was conceptualized by Max Seidman). Together, we performed research on gender bias and then designed the game mechanics: cryptic clues and object-balance. We tested the game on colleagues, students and children at the local library, and iteratively improved the game based on test results. We also wrote a large number of cryptic clues which all had to match our game message as well as adequately challenge our target audience.

Awkward Moment

Awkward Moment

Awkward Moment

A card game about the awkwardness of school, aimed at fostering proactive decision-making, stereotype exploration and a growth mindset. Part of the NSF-funded “Transforming Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) For Women and Girls: Reworking Stereotypes & Bias” project.

Designed in Spring 2012, for Tiltfactor Laboratory at Dartmouth College

Game Designers: Mary Flanagan, Andrea McClave, Viviana Ramos, Max Seidman, Zara Downs, Sukdith Punjasthitkul

In Awkward Moment, players respond to hypothetical situations in Moment Cards using Reaction Cards. Aimed at a younger audience, the game aims to foster decision making that reinforces growth mindset and the exploration of stereotypes.

For Awkward Moment, I was a writer and game tester. I was involved with creating text on cards, and play-testing the game with middle-school children, making observations, suggestions and improvements.

All photos courtesy of Tiltfactor. Check out the the game’s webpage.

Buffalo: The Amusing Name-Dropping Game

Buffalo: The Amusing Name-Dropping Game

Buffalo box

A simple and quirky card game aimed at challenging players’ stereotypes. Part of the NSF- funded “Transforming Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) For Women and Girls: Reworking Stereotypes & Bias” project.

Designed in Spring 2012 for Tiltfactor Laboratory at Dartmouth College

Game Designers: Mary Flanagan, Max Seidman, Sukdith Punjasthitkul

In Buffalo, players try to combine categories and then name famous individuals that match these combinations. Through this game, Tiltfactor aims to provoke reflection and discussion about players’ biases and stereotypes.

My own role in this game was as a writer and game tester. I was involved with creating the text on cards, and play-testing the game with people from different social strata (gender, age group etc.), making observations and suggesting changes to improve the game.

All photos courtesy of Tiltfactor. Check out the game’s webpage.